(Source: architectura, via coffeeandblueprints)

http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/who-runs-the-world/

http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/who-runs-the-world/

My thesis is a horse, no wait; it’s a gait.

My thesis is a horse, no wait; it’s a gait.

A breakthrough;

How do landspaces in urban forms form geography?

The answer; space syntax. A study on how these environments are formed.

urban-geographies, action/activation, linear/linearity, community, transition/threshold.

manifest please.

Design and/or Research.

Where does it stop being a practice in research and form into design?

deathful:

matthew borrett.

deathful:

matthew borrett.

Glenn Sestig Architects. - Colour as activator/indicator
www.trendland.com/glenn-sestig-architects

Glenn Sestig Architects. - Colour as activator/indicator

www.trendland.com/glenn-sestig-architects

Heading to a landscape design seminar, maybe it can point me in the right direction.

I guess that would place me somewhat inside?

TIM O’LOAN / AECOM | Friday April 20 2012 - 5.30PM


"What is the role of the landscape architect in the increasingly crowded realm of major urban projects and city making?


Increasingly the broader city making agenda is responding to the need to better manage ecological and financial resources and to design more resilient
urban infrastructure. The conversations around building and renewing our cities have moved beyond the single energy efficient building or stand alone highly
‘activated’ urban plaza and into the integration of a series of urban systems within a ‘precinct’ solution. We are beginning to not just look at the ‘urban field’
but are starting to believe we can build it.

The most recently proposed major projects are demanding a precinct scale consideration involving a broader set of practitioners to effectively realise a more
complete and viable urbanism. Notable landscape architectural academics have conducted research on and promoted this idea for over a decade. So where
are landscape architects now when the projects are starting to come on line?

Landscape architects have long considered themselves and their practice as one of ‘stitching’ many of the pieces together. We see our strengths in
simplifying complex design problems to create functional spaces unified by the larger ‘beautiful’ gesture. There are two critical elements to the practice of
Landscape Architecture; the ability to work with a series of scales, an ability to design spaces that evolve over time and an inherent understanding of how
places are experienced. These are three of the founding principles of our discipline and are critical in the development of major parts of our cities.

This presentation outlines a series of recent projects in which Tim O’Loan’s practice has attempted to collaboratively set the public realm agenda in small
and large ways from the outset. It is a collection of stories about how we have tried with failure and success to retain a sense of acting as the ‘designer’ and
enacting three of the founding principles of our practice in project development.

Tim O’Loan graduated from RMIT University’s Landscape Architecture undergraduate program in 2000, continuing on to complete his Masters in 2006.
Tim is Associate Director of AECOM.”

side product from deconstruction: re-formed, positive (or negative) space.

side product from deconstruction: re-formed, positive (or negative) space.